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The Symptoms of a Possible Brain Tumor


A claims supervisor based in Wilkes-Barre, PA, Daniel “Dan” Hohal is a graduate of Marywood University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration. Away from his work, Daniel Hohal lends his support to several charitable initiatives, including the National Brain Tumor Society, which funds and collaborates with researchers in the area.

The symptoms associated with brain tumors vary depending on where they are located and their size. Generally, they lead to increased pressure being felt somewhere in the head, resulting in headaches, feelings of nausea, and vomiting. Some may also experience mental fatigue and a number of vision problems, including blurriness and occasional vision loss.

Other symptoms are more specific to the position of the tumor. For example, those located in the cerebrum can cause body weakness, usually focused on one side, and issues with speech and memory. Those in the cerebellum affect your ability to maintain your balance, while tumors in the pituitary glands can cause hormone deficiencies. Each of these symptoms may also be indicative of other conditions, so visit a physician if you experience any of them.

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